OARC 2015 Fall Workshop (Montreal)

US/Eastern
St-Francois (Fairmont Queen Elizabeth)

St-Francois

Fairmont Queen Elizabeth

900 René-Lévesque Blvd W Montreal, QC H3B 4A5 Canada
Keith Mitchell (DNS-OARC), Sebastian Castro (NZRS)
Description

DNS-OARC's Fall 2015 Workshop was co-located with the NANOG 65 meeting in Montreal and sponsored by:

 

Gold and Social Sponsor


CIRA

 

Bronze Sponsor

Nominum

 

DNS-OARC Workshop meetings are open to OARC members and to all other parties interested in DNS operations and research, with NANOG and ARIN attendees particularly welcome this time around. Attendance is free for OARC Members, Speakers and Sponsors. There are charges for other attendees and late registrations.

If your organization is interested in sponsoring OARC workshops, please see our Sponsor Benefits or e-mail sponsor@dns-oarc.net for more information.

Participants
  • Aaron Johnson
  • Adam Fathauer
  • Adiel Akplogan
  • Ajay Sriram
  • Alan Stuart
  • Allison Mankin
  • Amanda Swain
  • Anand Buddhdev
  • Andree Toonk
  • Ask Bjørn Hansen
  • Austin Brower
  • Benjamin Zwittnig
  • Benno Overeinder
  • Bill Martin
  • Brad Verd
  • Brian Hartvigsen
  • Brian Somers
  • Bruce Roberts
  • Bruce Van Nice
  • Carl Clements
  • Charles Menser
  • Charlie Liu
  • Chris Griffiths
  • Christian Petrasch
  • Dalini Khemlani
  • Dane Foster
  • Danillo Roncoleta
  • Dave Knight
  • David Allen
  • David Farmer
  • David Jeffers
  • David Kwong
  • David Lawrence
  • Denesh Bhabuta
  • Devon Mizelle
  • Donavan Miller
  • Duane Wessels
  • Eddy Winstead
  • Eduardo Alvarez
  • Eduardo Duarte
  • Eric Malenfant
  • Evan Thompson
  • Filippo Valsorda
  • Geoff Huston
  • Gonzalo Muñoz
  • Guanggang Geng
  • Gustavo Lozano
  • Isaiah Connell
  • Jacob Zack
  • Jacques Latour
  • James Cowie
  • Jason Castonguay
  • Jean Roy
  • Jenn Viau
  • Jesse Blazina
  • Jim Martin
  • Joao Luis Silva Damas
  • John Barnitz
  • John Crain
  • John Dickinson
  • John Sax
  • Jonathan Stewart
  • Jordan Labelle
  • Joseph Abley
  • Joseph Gersch
  • Karl Dyson
  • Kazunori Fujiwara
  • Keith Mitchell
  • Kristopher Beevers
  • Lanlan Pan
  • Liam Hynes
  • Luis Gonzalez
  • Maarten Wullink
  • Marcelo Gardini
  • Marco Díaz
  • Mathias Wolkert
  • Matt Larson
  • Matt Rowley
  • Matt Weinberg
  • Matthew Pounsett
  • Matthew Thomas
  • Mauricio Vergara Ereche
  • Michael McNally
  • Michael Sinatra
  • Miles McCredie
  • Mingkai Zhang
  • Nathanael Jean-Francois
  • Noah Robin
  • Ondrej Filip
  • Ondřej Surý
  • Paul Ebersman
  • Paul Hoffman
  • Paul Wouters
  • Peter Hagopian
  • Peter Janssen
  • Peter Popovich
  • Petr Andreev
  • Piet Barber
  • Qiang Ke
  • Raja Mandapati
  • Ralf Weber
  • Ramzy Bcharah
  • Randy Bush
  • Ray Bellis
  • Rhonda McFadden
  • Robert Edmonds
  • Robert Gray
  • Rock Chantigny
  • Roy Arends
  • Roy Boos
  • Roy Hicks
  • Roy Hooper
  • Saib Isa
  • Sandoche Balakrichenan
  • Sanju Varghese
  • Sara Dickinson
  • Sean Stuart
  • Sebastian Castro
  • Shane Kerr
  • Shannon Weyrick
  • Shumon Huque
  • Sree Raghu Harsha Yalamati
  • Stephan Lagerholm
  • Susan Graves
  • Tim April
  • Tim Wicinski
  • Tomas Hlavacek
  • Tongfeng Zhang
  • Trevor Davis
  • Valerie Detweiler
  • Victoria Risk
  • Warren Kumari
  • Will Pressly
  • William Manning
  • William Sotomayor
  • Zhang Xinyue
  • Zhang Zaifeng
  • Ólafur Guðmundsson
Support - Help
    • 10:00 12:30
      Members Session St-Francois

      St-Francois

      Fairmont Queen Elizabeth

      900 René-Lévesque Blvd W Montreal, QC H3B 4A5 Canada
      Agenda
      • 10:00
        Introduction from OARC Chairman 5m
        Speaker: Mr. Ondrej Filip (CZ.NIC)
      • 10:05
        OARC President's Report 20m
        Speaker: Mr. Keith Mitchell (DNS-OARC)
        Slides
      • 10:25
        OARC Treasurer's Report 10m
        Speaker: Duane Wessels (Verisign)
        Slides
      • 10:35
        OARC Board Elections 10m
        Web Page
      • 10:45
        Morning Coffee Break 30m
      • 11:15
        OARC Systems Report 20m
        Speaker: Mr. William Sotomayor (DNS-OARC)
        Slides
      • 11:35
        OARC Projects Update 20m
        Speaker: Ms. Dalini Khemlani (DNS-OARC)
        Slides
      • 11:55
        DNS Software Test Centre Proposal 20m
        Speaker: Mr. Ralf Weber (Nominum Inc)
        Slides
    • 12:30 14:00
      Lunch 1h 30m Hochelaga 1

      Hochelaga 1

      Fairmont Queen Elizabeth

    • 14:00 15:30
      Public Workshop: DNSSEC Track St-Francois

      St-Francois

      Fairmont Queen Elizabeth

      900 René-Lévesque Blvd W Montreal, QC H3B 4A5 Canada
      Convener: Paul Ebersman (Comcast)
      • 14:00
        An Overview of DNS Privacy Mechanisms 30m
        As part of the IETF's efforts to secure all protocols against pervasive surveillance, several privacy enhancements to the DNS are actively being developed with prototype implementations of such enhancements also emerging. This talk will provide a technical description of these mechanisms as well as deployment challenges and related considerations. Topics to be covered will include query-name minimization, DNS over TLS/DTLS and other encryption proposals, payload padding, etc. We will also cover related efforts to minimize leakage of DNS names in other protocols.
        Speakers: Allison Mankin (Verisign Labs), Mr. Shumon Huque (Verisign Labs)
        Slides
      • 14:30
        Using TLS for DNS privacy in practice 30m
        This talk will focus on the existing prototype implementations of DNS-over-TLS and dive into some of the finer points of using TLS in practice. This will include authentication issues, performance considerations, TCP connection management, DoS mitigation and a demonstration. It will also discuss the current best practices for using TLS in applications and the upcoming developments in TLS 1.3.
        Speaker: Sara Dickinson (Sinodun IT)
        Slides
      • 15:00
        Next Steps in DANE Adoption 30m
        This talk will discuss upcoming and future steps envisioned to increase the adoption of DNSSEC and DANE (DNS-based Authentication of Named Entities) by Internet applications. It will start by providing an overview of the current state of adoption of DANE, and then discuss challenges faced by some application communities and some applications for which DANE doesn't yet provide a solution. Among the topics covered will be a proposed new TLS extension to allow servers to deliver a DANE record and the associated DNSSEC chain to clients, a mechanism to allow the use of TLSA records for client authentication, and others.
        Speaker: Mr. Shumon Huque (Verisign Labs)
        Slides
    • 15:30 16:00
      Afternoon Coffee Break 30m St-Francois

      St-Francois

      Fairmont Queen Elizabeth

      900 René-Lévesque Blvd W Montreal, QC H3B 4A5 Canada
    • 16:00 17:50
      Public Workshop: Benchmarking Track St-Francois

      St-Francois

      Fairmont Queen Elizabeth

      900 René-Lévesque Blvd W Montreal, QC H3B 4A5 Canada
      Convener: Liam Hynes (Dyn)
      • 16:00
        Benchmarking of authoritative DNS servers and DNSSEC impact assessment 30m
        CZ.NIC Labs created and continues to actively develop Knot DNS authoritative DNS server. The development team puts substantial effort into optimizing the server performance and searching for new optimization opportunities. So we created a DISTEL-based lab for benchmarking not only our server but for comparing many different authoritative DNS servers and versions. The presentation shows our method for collecting data, explain statistics that we use for testing hypotheses about the server performance and presents results for Knot 2.0 and others with regard to mixed DNSSEC and non-DNSSEC traffic.
        Speaker: Mr. Tomas Hlavacek (CZ.NIC, z.s.p.o.)
        Slides
      • 16:30
        Impact of unknown EDNS options on the DNS 15m
        The EDNS (Extension mechanisms for DNS) protocol allows us to add new features to DNS that were not envisioned when DNS was originally specified. DNSSEC, Client-subnet Identifier and DNS cookies are applications that use EDNS. It appears from ISC's testing that a significant percentage of sites that support EDNS do not respond well to unknown EDNS options. The failure mode can be as severe as disabling EDNS (breaking DNSSEC). We are reluctant to encourage the use of new EDNS options until there is better tolerance for unknown EDNS options in the DNS. We would like to raise awareness of the issue, and find out what the community thinks we should do to address it. This presentation will review the [results of our testing][1] and the current EDNS failure modes we see, and explain how to [test your own site][2] for compliance. [1]: http://ednscomp.isc.org/ [2]: http://ednscomp.isc.org/ednscomp
        Speaker: victoria risk (isc)
        Slides
      • 16:45
        Benchmarking and profiling DNS systems with modern Linux tools 15m
        This talk will outline the use of tools from the netsniff-ng toolkit and the Linux kernel along with a home-grown benchmark harness to characterize UDP DNS performance. These tools operate very differently from "traditional" utilities like dnsperf/resperf and produce very different results, possibly contradicting conventional wisdom that UDP on Linux is slow.
        Speaker: Robert Edmonds (Farsight Security, Inc.)
        Slides
      • 17:00
        Impact of DNS over TCP - a resolver point of view 30m
        Using traffic captured at two different ISP's recursive resolvers we analise the potential impact on the servers of long lived TCP sessions, investigating the effect of timeout settings, the total number of simultaneous connections that would be kept open and the potential benefits of connection reuse as proposed in the current version of draft-ietf-dnsop-5966bis, with the intent of offering simulated operational advice, based on observerd traffic. The study looks at the impact on the recursive server as it queries authoritative servers as well as while it talks to stubs, two very different aspects of the life of a recursive server.
        Speaker: Mr. Joao Luis Silva Damas (Bond Internet Systems)
        Slides
      • 17:30
        Idea: DNS over QUIC / zone transfer over QUIC or TLS/TCP 15m
        The presentation discusses just an idea about DNS over QUIC and zone transfer over QUIC or TLS/TCP. The third transport of DNS may be QUIC. Both DNS and QUIC use UDP and port 53/UDP may be possible to share. (If possible, implementation status will be reported, but it seems hard.) And zone transfers may be performed over QUIC or TLS/TCP transport with server certificate authentication.
        Speaker: Mr. Kazunori Fujiwara (Japan Registry Services Co., Ltd)
        Slides
    • 18:00 21:00
      Social Event 3h 5th Floor (Pandore)

      5th Floor

      Pandore

      1300, rue Saint-Dominique Montréal, QCH2X1K4

      Sponsored by CIRA

    • 09:00 10:30
      Public Workshop: Operations Track St-Francois

      St-Francois

      Fairmont Queen Elizabeth

      900 René-Lévesque Blvd W Montreal, QC H3B 4A5 Canada
      Convener: Mr. Sebastian Castro (NZRS)
      • 09:00
        OpenDNS; Managing DDoS Attacks 30m
        Open resolvers will always be a target for abuse either as an attack amplification point or as a mask of the attack source. This presentation discusses the measures that OpenDNS has put in place to ensure that their open resolvers contribute towards reducing or blocking DDoS attacks. It goes on to discuss future plans to identify limit or block DoS sources.
        Speaker: Mr. Brian Somers (OpenDNS, FreeBSD)
        Slides
      • 09:30
        Continuous Integration & Continuous Deployment - For the new nameserver infrastructures of DENIC eG 30m
        This Abstract describes the concepts, the development and the functionalities of the DENIC DNS Countinuous Integration and Deployment Pipeline. Furthermore the advantages you could receive through this technics and automated testing. More informations will follow in the summary form.
        Speaker: Mr. Christian Petrasch (DENIC eG)
      • 10:00
        Neutering ANY queries: how we did it 30m
        DNS ANY queries are a source of controversy and strong feelings. In practice ANY queries are used for debug purposes, but are frequently abused in amplification attacks, as they give the best amplification factor. In some non-traditional DNS authoritative servers the cost of answering ANY queries can be high due to multiple DB lookups and dynamic records. Once in a while someone thinks that using ANY query is a good way to reliably get all RRsets in one query, frequently without understanding the semantics or implications. We have explored a number of alternatives to answer ANY queries without breaking any deployed systems, and at the same time discourage the use of ANY query. In this talk we will cover the alternatives and present our solution to a cacheable, non-breaking “negative” answer to ANY queries.
        Speaker: Mr. Ólafur Guðmundsson (CloudFlare Inc.)
        Slides
    • 10:30 11:00
      Morning Coffee Break 30m St-Francois

      St-Francois

      Fairmont Queen Elizabeth

      900 René-Lévesque Blvd W Montreal, QC H3B 4A5 Canada
    • 11:00 12:30
      Public Workshop: Data Analysis St-Francois

      St-Francois

      Fairmont Queen Elizabeth

      900 René-Lévesque Blvd W Montreal, QC H3B 4A5 Canada
      Convener: Mr. Sean Stuart (Verisign)
      • 11:00
        Internet Performance Impacts of Canadian Content Hosting 30m
        In addition to driving ccTLD growth, a strong national content hosting industry improves consumer experience by making content faster, cheaper, and more accessible. Ironically, the existence of a large content-hosting industry next door has tended to artificially reduce the percentage of both Canadian and Mexican content that is domestically hosted. In this talk, we'll examine the most popular domains in Canada (using Alexa ranking data), as well as the much broader spectrum of domains hosted in .CA. We'll utilize BGP routing and IP geolocation to assess the geographies and key providers that support Canada's current state of domestic versus international content placement. Beyond this basic census, we'll also examine some of the potential performance impacts of nonlocal hosting on content consumers in both Eastern and Western Canada.
        Speakers: Jim Cowie (Dyn, Inc.), Matt Larson (Dyn, Inc.)
        Slides
      • 11:30
        DNS big data analytics 30m
        #Introduction As the operator of the .nl ccTLD, SIDN is very interested in keeping the .nl zone as safe as possible. Analyzing the query data can help to detect cybercrime activity in the .nl zone which we can than try to cleanup. Traditional DNS query data analysis done by storing data as PCAP's and analyzing them with tools such a tshark and wireshark is often a slow and painful process. When storing DNS query data as PCAP files makes you will quickly run into performance and scalability problems. Most tooling used to analyze PCAP's is single threaded and has limited or no sql compatibility. What is required is a system which can cope with large volumes of PCAP data and still offer good query performance. That's why SIDN developed a DNS big data platform called ENTRADA, this platform is built on top of the Hadoop stack using open source technology. DNS query data from our authoritative name servers is stored on this platform and can be analyzed using multiple interfaces and languages. The system supports SQL, which means that anyone with SQL knowledge can quickly start analyzing the query data. Currently the database contains over 64 billion DNS queries, each day some 130 million new queries are added and this number will grow as we hook up more name servers. In this presentation I will be talking about system design, use cases and our experiences. #Platform design The platform at SIDN is used by the R&D team and is quite small (5 nodes) The costs of setting up such a cluster are very modest, the main components are as expected hardware and people. The hardware does not have to be enterprise grade and much of the required knowledge is available for free online. Adding more storage and compute capacity is as simple as adding more disk drives or servers. The cluster storage capacity at the moment is about 100 billion DNS queries and this data can be queried very efficiently. Depending on the type of query and number of data partitions that have to be scanned, most queries will return a result within seconds. #Privacy Privacy is an important aspect when collecting DNS data, because the query data might reveal personal information about the users who are sending DNS queries. The IP address of a client can in some cases be used to identify and track users (for a home user operating a private resolver, or for small shared resolvers) We designed a novel privacy framework (1) because it introduces privacy management to the use of DNS data and (2) because, to that end, it integrates legal, organizational and technical aspects of privacy management. This is described in our paper: https://www.sidnlabs.nl/uploads/tx_sidnpublications/SIDN_Labs_Privacyraamwerk_Position_Paper_V1.4_ENG.pdf #Workflow The time it takes from a query being received on the name server until it is available in the database for analysis is just a couple of minutes. The steps involved are: - get pcap data every x minutes from NS - PCAP conversion - enrichment of data - storage - query! #Storage There are a lot of different storage technologies, we chose to use the Parquet format to encode the data and Hadoop HDFS as a distributed storage layer. This part explains why Parquet is such a good fit for storing DNS data. - Why we chose Parquet - Size difference ( pcap vs parquet, total database size) - How do you convert pcap data to parquet (write parquet with Avro schema (KiteSDK)) - Parquet format can be read by Impala but also by Spark, this makes it very flexible. #Query engines and interfaces The data stored in the system can be access through multiple query engines and interfaces. The support workloads from a simple sql query to advanced graph and machine learning jobs. Impala/Impyla (SQL engine) Spark (SQL/Graph/Machine learning engine) Hue (SQL web interface) Jupyter (python notebook) #use cases Focused on increasing the security and stability of .nl - DNS security App (visualize traffic patterns for phishing domain names) - Botnet detector (detect botnet infections and report these to abuse information exchange (https://www.abuseinformationexchange.nl/english)) - Real-time Phishing domain name detection - Statistics dashboard (stats.sidnlabs.nl) - Scientific research (collaboration with Dutch Universities) - Ad-hoc operational analysis (quick analysis of current issues in the DNS) #experiences Our experiences in working with this data: So much work to be done when this data is available, we hired an additional Data scientist. Future work: - Combine passive data from .nl authoritative name server with active scans of the complete .nl zone and ISP data. - Adding more name servers and resolvers. - Open data interface #Summary 1. We believe that our choice of technology combined with our privacy framework is quite novel. 2. Our setup proves that a big data platform can start small with limited costs and still be powerful. 3. We provide the rational behind our architectural decisions with regards to tools, workflow and data formats for storage. 4. We provide example use cases of what is possible when this data is available for analysis.
        Speaker: Mr. M Wullink (SIDN)
        Slides
      • 12:00
        Cluster the long tailed domains base on passiveDNS.cn 15m
        Cluster the DNS domains is a basic but very important work in analyzing the dizzy businesses of the Internet. Only based on the accurate clustered domain result, we can discern and analyze all kinds of DNS data. Now, most of the works focus on the domain structure and hoping finding the relationships among kinds of domains. Recently, based on the largest public passiveDNS database in China, we are exploring some new but beneficial ways on cluster the long tailed domains(based on some filter rules). Except the domain structure, we add two dimensions: client and server data. Introduce the real data of up-down stream is a big extension, of course it's more accurate. From the test result, the two dimensions is helpful in clustering the domains and finding the both benign and malicous domain communities.
        Speaker: Mr. zaifeng zhang (QIHOO 360)
        Slides
      • 12:15
        Publishing zone scan data using an open data portal 15m
        NZRS has been running zone scans on a monthly basis over the active .nz domain names for the past two years. We are using dnscheck with custom changes to collect DNS health information, as well as IPv6 deployment metrics. The data is of no use if it can't be made readily available to interested parties. To sort this out, NZRS will start using an open data portal provided by Socrata to allow open access to the zone scan and other datasets about the registry operations. The data portal will allow to download the data, but also to explore it in a visual way. This presentation will cover - Methodology and infrastructure to run the zone scan - Overview of the data collected - Introduction to the open data portal (possibly a demo) - Some interesting findings. Time required: Ideally 30 minutes, but can be adjusted to be a lightning talk.
        Speaker: Mr. Sebastian Castro (NZRS)
        Slides
    • 12:30 14:00
      Lunch 1h 30m Hochelaga 1

      Hochelaga 1

      Fairmont Queen Elizabeth

    • 13:00 14:00
      PGP Signing Session 1h St-Francois

      St-Francois

      Fairmont Queen Elizabeth

      900 René-Lévesque Blvd W Montreal, QC H3B 4A5 Canada
      Speaker: Mr. Mauricio Vergara Ereche (ICANN)
      notes
      PGP Keyring
    • 14:00 15:30
      Public Workshop: Root Data Analysis St-Francois

      St-Francois

      Fairmont Queen Elizabeth

      900 René-Lévesque Blvd W Montreal, QC H3B 4A5 Canada
      Convener: Mr. Mauricio Vergara Ereche (ICANN)
      • 14:00
        A study of caching behavior with respect to root server TTLs 30m
        The Root Server System Advisory Committee (RSSAC) within ICANN was recently tasked with considering the extent to which the current root zone TTLs are appropriate for today's Internet environment and the impacts of root TTL alterations on the wider DNS system. The historical DITL data from 2014 and 2015 was analyzed for trends in TTL adherence, answering some of the following questions: To what degree do root zone TTLs matter? Is there a difference in behavior for authoritative versus non-authoritative data? Do all TLDs exhibit similar inter-query time distributions? Do specific recursive implementations, ISPs, open resolvers, etc. diverge from general TTL adherence trends? How has inter-query time changed over the past two years? Would a change in root zone TTLs result in a change in traffic levels at root name servers?
        Speakers: Duane Wessels (Verisign), Matthew Thomas (Verisign)
        Slides
      • 14:30
        F-root Anycast Research using RIPE Atlas 30m
        ISC has been using data routinely collected by every RIPE Atlas node to research the effectiveness of F-root's current transit and peering arrangements. The presentation will show how visualisation of this data can identify issues that should be resolved, along with "before and after" pictures showing the effect of changes that we already made to our routing configuration based on this analysis.
        Speaker: Mr. Ray Bellis (Internet Systems Consortium, Inc.)
        Slides
      • 15:00
        Thirteen Years of "Old J Root" 30m
        Thirteen years ago Verisign renumbered j.root-servers.net so that it could be anycasted. Since that time, we have been continuing to answer queries sent to the old IP address. We have also been collecting some data on queries to old J-root. In this presentation we will explore such questions as: what do we know about the clients of old J-root? Do they overlap with clients of the real J-root? Are there noticeable differences in traffic characteristics (e.g., EDNS, DNSSEC, query types) between the two? Does old J-root traffic fluctuate in the same way as real traffic? When real J-root gets attacked, does old J-root also get attacked? If so, can this be used to identify attacks coming through recursive name servers?
        Speaker: Duane Wessels (Verisign)
        Slides
    • 15:30 16:00
      Afternoon Coffee Break 30m St-Francois

      St-Francois

      Fairmont Queen Elizabeth

      900 René-Lévesque Blvd W Montreal, QC H3B 4A5 Canada
    • 16:00 17:45
      Public Workshop: Resolvers Track St-Francois

      St-Francois

      Fairmont Queen Elizabeth

      900 René-Lévesque Blvd W Montreal, QC H3B 4A5 Canada
      Convener: Duane Wessels (Verisign)
      • 16:00
        Analyzing the distribution of DNS clients to recursive name servers across the Internet 30m
        As a byproduct of our web-based Real User Monitoring (RUM) agent, Dyn obtains the IP addresses of individual hosts running web browsers all over the world as well as the IP addresses of the recursive servers queried by those hosts. We have analyzed a rich data set of over 110 million client IP address-to-recursive IP address mappings to research an area of DNS that we believe has not been sufficiently studied. For example, what is the distribution of the number of clients per recursive server? Where are clients located relative to the recursive servers they use, both from a geographic as well as network topological perspective? What query patterns do individual clients follow if they use multiple recursive servers? We report on these and other interesting findings.
        Speaker: Matt Larson (Dyn, Inc.)
        Slides
      • 16:30
        Real World Impacts of EDNS Client Subnet 30m
        Client Subnet offers the ability to offer better geolocation of end-users via DNS responses. This talk will concentrate on what happens when Client Subnet is enabled on a public resolver. It will look at upstream traffic patterns, cache performance, and other factors that come into play with Client Subnet. At the end of this talk, DNS providers should have a better idea of how Client Subnet will impact their performance & network.
        Speaker: Brian Hartvigsen (OpenDNS)
        Slides
      • 17:00
        dnstap-whoami: one-legged exfiltration of resolver queries 15m
        A few existing "whoami" or "dnsecho" authoritative DNS services allow for limited extraction of information about the resolver to the original client that would normally be hidden. For example, querying an anycasted resolver like 8.8.8.8 with the command "dig @8.8.8.8 whoami.akamai.net" will return an address record revealing a unicast initiator address used by the anycast service. This is "one-legged", because the original client only has visibility into the stub/recursive "leg" of the DNS interaction. The DNS-OARC porttest tool is another example of a "one-legged" service. Similarly, many DNS research projects use special purpose zones with instrumented nameservers which capture incoming query packets for analysis. For example, scans for open recursive DNS servers typically control both the stub/recursive "leg" and the recursive/authoritative "leg" and are thus "two-legged". This requires a more heavyweight investment but results in a richer set of data. This talk will demonstrate an enhanced "whoami" authoritative DNS server that can exfiltrate more detailed information about the recursive/authoritative interaction to the original client, including the complete resolver query packet sent to the authoritative server, using the dnstap format to compactly tunnel structured information which can be decoded by the original client.
        Speaker: Robert Edmonds (Farsight Security, Inc.)
        Slides
      • 17:15
        Happy DNS Eyeballs? 30m
        Much work has been undertaken in the browser world to produce the so-called "Happy Eyeballs" outcome. This is an outcome where the client will detect if the service is a dual stack service and if so then use a connection process that slightly biases the client in favour of using IPv6 as the transport for the DNS. What evidence is there for a similar mode of behaviour of DNS resolvers? This presentation will report on a large scale measurement experiment that was intended to expose the protocol behaviour of resolvers and determine whether they have any protocol selection bias.
        Speaker: Mr. Geoff Huston (APNIC)
        Slides
    • 15:15 17:15
      NANOG65 DNS Track Jolliet

      Jolliet

      Fairmont Queen Elizabeth

      Registered NANOG65 Attendees only

      Conveners: Duane Wessels (Verisign), Paul Ebersman (Comcast)
      summary
      • 15:15
        DNS-OARC Overview 10m Jolliet

        Jolliet

        Fairmont Queen Elizabeth

        Speaker: Mr. Keith Mitchell (DNS-OARC)
        Slides
      • 15:25
        Managing DDoS Attacks 30m Jolliet

        Jolliet

        Fairmont Queen Elizabeth

        Speaker: Mr. Brian Somers (OpenDNS, FreeBSD)
        Slides
      • 15:55
        F-root Anycast Research using RIPE Atlas 30m Jolliet

        Jolliet

        Fairmont Queen Elizabeth

        Speaker: Mr. Ray Bellis (Internet Systems Consortium, Inc.)
        Slides
      • 16:25
        Impact of unknown EDNS options on the DNS 10m Jolliet

        Jolliet

        Fairmont Queen Elizabeth

        Speakers: Eddy Winstead, victoria risk (isc)
        Slides
      • 16:35
        Benchmarking of authoritative DNS servers and DNSSEC impact assessment 30m Jolliet

        Jolliet

        Fairmont Queen Elizabeth

        Speaker: Mr. Tomas Hlavacek (CZ.NIC, z.s.p.o.)
        Slides
      • 17:05
        Root KSK Rollover 10m Jolliet

        Jolliet

        Fairmont Queen Elizabeth

        Speaker: Adiel Akplogan (ICANN)
        Slides
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